Happy Hour: Hot Toddy Happy Hour: Hot Toddy

Happy Hour: Hot Toddy

As we live in a world where the peculiarities of weather are decided not by the movements of air and heat, but by the whims of a subterranean rodent, we will now have to endure 6 more weeks of winter. If it’s anything like these past few weeks, then it will be cold and dreary without even a fleck of snow that would at least make this weather aesthetically pleasing. So when you’re shutting yourself in and cranking up the heat, a nice warm drink could help stave away the chill of the night. Enter the Hot Toddy.

Like many drinks created in Ireland and Scotland, at its core this drink is adding whiskey to something you would be drinking anyway. It pairs a hot tea-like brew, with the natural warmth of ages spirits that will not only will it help you sleep, but help to sooth the symptoms of the flu. Whether you’re sick, or just simply cold, try out this take on the classic recipe.

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Supplies:

1.5 oz whiskey, bourbon

1 stick or 1.5 tbsp of ground cinnamon

2 tbsp honey

1 lemon

Water

Directions:

Start by filling a small saucepan with water and bringing it to a simmer. Meanwhile, zest your entire lemon (tip: you can use the super small part of your cheese grater if you don’t have a zester) and add to the water along with your cinnamon and honey. Simmer until the honey is dissolved and it takes on a dark tea-brown color. If using a stick of cinnamon, this could take a little longer, but your kitchen will start to smell wonderful.

When ready, either strain out the zest or ladle the lemon brew into your mug, and add bourbon and about 2 tablespoons of juice from your zested lemon. If needed, feel free to add more honey and lemon juice.

Even Easier, Not As Fun Version:

Brew a lemon tea, like Lemon-Zinger, and add honey and bourbon.

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Nate has photographed everything from rugby games and theatre performances to night life on Bourbon Street, Engagements in Ireland, and the oceans and islands of Greece.  Through all of this journey he has concentrated on producing creative work that captures the life found all around us.